Humanity – In Production

June 9, 2016 § Leave a comment

While driven by a passion for The Art of the Book, each of our titles in the soon to be complete 21st Editions Master Collection takes diligence, patience and intense focus. Humanity, our 57th collaboration involving 10 artisans, is no exception.

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Here is what is involved in the making of Humanity: Conceptualizing and developing the content; designing the book; contact printing the platinum prints one at a time; selecting the paper; making or preparing the text paper to size; making and printing the letterpress plates; folding each signature to prepare for sewing; silk-screening the fabric for the box covers; cutting the separate pieces that will make up the box; constructing and lining the box; designing, printing, trimming and attaching the paste and flyleaf papers for each book; preparing the cloth for adhering to the cover boards and stamping them; trimming and tipping in nine platinum prints; making the folder for the three free-standing, signed platinum prints; attaching the finished cover boards to the sewn book block; marrying all fifty sets; and finally numbering each book before shipping to institutions and collectors at the end of the year.

Please call Pam or Steven (508 398 3000) regarding copies of Humanity that may still be available.

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HUMANITY & The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

March 22, 2016 § Leave a comment

McCurry’s work presented in platinum for the first time.

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Although Steve McCurry is best known as a color photographer, we have printed these images in platinum. There are two reasons for doing this. The first is to highlight the degree to which McCurry’s work needs to be appreciated not only in the tradition of documentary, but also as a fine-art photographer. Critics typically refer to him as a documentarian. And yet the subtle tonal ranges and luminescence of these prints, coupled with the artistry of their compositions, reveals that they are at least as much “pictorial” as documentary. They explode the lingering and largely false dichotomy between fine-art and documentary photography.

…these platinum prints showcase new forms of McCurry’s humanity, as compelling as their color counterparts. One might say that in different ways, each format highlights connections: between photographer, subject, and viewer; and/or among the people in the images. In both formats, it is as though McCurry penetrates beneath the surface into the heart and spirit, giving us a unique intimacy with his subjects. In doing so, he enlists his subjects as evangelists as few artists have done, bringing people together from around the world.

– from the introduction by John Stauffer

Announcing: Steve McCurry’s HUMANITY

February 11, 2016 § Leave a comment

Twelve signed platinum prints, of which three are loose, illustrating Edward Fitzgerald’s complete first (1859) edition of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. This is the first time that Steve McCurry’s work has been presented in platinum.

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“Steve McCurry is one of the best-known artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and one of the most influential. His images have helped connect us to parts of the world we have never been to, humanizing our perceptions of people throughout the world.

But there is one image of McCurry’s that almost everyone knows, even if they don’t know who made it. We are referring, of course, to Sharbat Gula, Afghan Girl (1984). It is not too much to say that Afghan Girl has changed the world, “searing the heart” of viewers, owing to its power to inform our perception of humanity. For over thirty years, it has enabled millions of people to connect with another person across wide gulfs of cultural difference. It is this sense of connectedness, achieved through photography, that is McCurry’s great and rare gift to humanity.”

– from the introduction by John Stauffer

Jefferson Hayman, the modern-day Coburn

September 4, 2015 § Leave a comment

Jefferson Hayman is the modern-day Alvin Langdon Coburn. Ever since I saw Jeff’s work I knew I was looking at a future entry into the history of photography. After having known Jeff coming up on a decade, I am sure that Jeff’s vision was and is his own. This question begs to be asked because his style is so very akin to the work of Stieglitz, Steichen, and most of all, Coburn. As Coburn may have only enjoyed having an upstage position for about 15 years, I would bet that Hayman is going to be around for the long haul. What he has that is unique to the others is his presentation. That in itself, is as much about his art as is the photograph. Jeff is a conceptualist, a sculptor, and a photographer. All of these reasons are why we published him in “The New City.” If anyone goes to see the upcoming exhibition at the Eastman House (www.eastmanhouse.org) on Coburn, you might want to keep in mind the quiet artist who is making his way in the U.S. and overseas in a deliberate and focused attempt to merely do what he does. The fact that he is doing it very well and that there is no one like him, might give us pause to think what his show will look like when he is long gone. I am certain it will be astounding.

-Steven Albahari
Publisher, 21st Editions

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Three Outstanding Projects for 2015

March 5, 2015 § Leave a comment

Goerge Tice

George Tice  THE JANUS TURN  Adam Johnson

This book unites the work of two American masters one might think were radically dissimilar. “However, in truth they share a similar emotionally ominous vision.” (John Wood)

George Tice has been photographing since 1953. His career has been primarily focused on the fine print and the photography book, so it is more than fitting that he now has a 21st Editions title. Tice’s trees are paired here with a short story by Adam Johnson, one of the great literary figures of our era. Johnson won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for fiction.

12 bound, plus 2 loose platinum prints, each signed by Tice. 13×15 inches. Handmade.

 

Todd Webb

TODD WEBB: NEW YORK, 1946

A remarkable story told through Todd Webb’s journal entries and with an introduction by 21st Editions new editor, John Stauffer. Webb’s association with Alfred Stieglitz was an intimate one, as his was with Berenice Abbott, Beaumont Newhall, Harry and Eleanor Callahan (housemates), Georgia O’Keeffe, and others. 1946 was an auspicious year that saw the deaths of Stieglitz, Gertrude Stein, Joseph Stella, Arthur Dove, and Moholy-Nagy. Todd Webb: New York, 1946 is a rare look into New York and the life of Webb and those in his circle that have defined the standard for a great photograph, then and now.

15 bound and 3 loose Estate platinum prints, plus 2 vintage silver prints that were printed and signed by Todd Webb. 13.5×13.5 inches. Handmade.

 

MIchael Murray

Michael Murray  WORLDS APART

“The elemental to the engineered, an epic narrative told through a magically real photographic perspective that is timeless, original, and epiphanic.” (Gideon Bosker)

“Murray’s genius resides in the brilliance of his eye, in its weaving of the world’s disparate parts together into a cohesive and wondrous whole.” (John Wood)

“With Worlds Apart, Murray takes his place alongside some of the great visionaries of photography, who have also been inspired by the concepts of utopia and dystopia… Photography often functions as a powerful telescope, through which artists construct their visions of a new world, according the critic and curator Yasufumi Nakamori. Much like his visionary predecessors, Murray’s utopian vision depends upon his revolutionary aesthetic. His art creates his utopia.” (John Stauffer, Harvard University)

15 bound and 16 loose pigment ink prints, plus two images printed on anodized aluminum, presented as an A-frame sculpture, all 33 printed and signed by the artist. 15.5 x 15.5 inches. Handmade.

from OLD CITY LIFE

August 14, 2014 § Leave a comment

OLD CITY LIFE (August 2014)

“…’The objective of what we do is to exemplify through form the very essence of (an artist’s) work, but in Love, Graham Nash it became more about the essence of the man, his vision, his music. In this case, the man and the artist are virtually inseparable. He is relentless in his pursuit of the bigger picture,’ says Steven Albahari, publisher, 21st Editions, The Art of the Book.

If you’ve never heard of Love, Graham Nash, 21st Editions or Steven Albahari, stop reading right now and visit the website. (www.21steditions.com.) Seriously. it’s that important. Because until you see the quality, scope and creativity of The Art of the Book collections, it will be almost impossible to grasp the artistic contribution Nash has made through his collaboration with Albahari and his 21st Editions publishing partner, acclaimed poet John Wood. (Google him too if you need to – you’ll be glad you did.) Defined as ‘interactive performance art’ by Albahari, Nash’s artistic ‘neighbors’ at 21st Editions include Sally Mann, Joel-Peter Witkin, Imogen Cunningham and Herman Leonard (the collection Listen: Herman Leonard and His World of Jazz was honored with the 2010 Lucie Award).

Whatever most of us think we know about Graham Nash, many of us don’t know about his talent for capturing a moment – or, in this case, an entire era – through an image. He became obsessed with taking pictures at a very early age and learned about photography from his father, who went to jail because of a misunderstanding over a $30 camera. Nash explains, ‘That was very traumatic for me. I was a young boy and my father’s main joy in his life was this camera that he’d bought from a friend. The police came to our door, my father wouldn’t reveal his friend’s name and, long story short, he ended up in jail.’

Nash went on to collect multiple honors for his own work, has curated the work of others and established Nash Editions, recognized by the Smithsonian Institution for its role in the invention of digital fine art printing. Both his first IRIS 3047 printer and his 1969 portrait of David Crosby are in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

With all these accolades, why take on a project of this magnitude? Four years in the making, one in production and Nash involved almost every step of the way. Simple. ‘The one thing I’ve always demanded from the universe is quality. I want the best, always. When Steven showed me some of the books he had produced, I wanted to do one with him.’

Photographer and St. Augustine-resident Kenneth Barrett, Jr., has seen the 21st Editions Love, Graham Nash collection and considers it to be ‘a piece of living history. We are viewing an era through the eyes of Graham Nash and the people with whom he interacted. Nash always had his camera with him and was on the forefront of the digital printing era. What he’s done here is put together a fabulous look at life through his lens. And he saw it all. As an insider, he was allowed to wander around behind the scenes where you and I or other photographers and journalists wouldn’t have that kind of access.’

And what is the bigger picture? Nash doesn’t hesitate. ‘The bigger picture here is that as dire as the world seems, as crazy as it seems, as violent as it seems, there are many, many wonderful things done in this world every day. Hope is better than depression, love is better than hatred and peace is better than war.’ Where do we start? Again, at least for Graham Nash, it’s simple. ‘If you don’t like violence, don’t beat people up. If you’re looking for beauty, appreciate beauty wherever you might find it. Be what you want to see.’ And which photo in the Love, Graham Nash collection best represents that bigger picture for the photographer himself ? I suggest my favorite; a simple shot of Nash’s wife Susan nursing their now-32-year-old daughter Nile. It took a minute, but he agreed. ‘Yes, I think that does represent the essence of what I believe. Our children, even though they are 25% of our population, are actually 100% of our future and if we don’t teach them a better way of dealing with our fellow human beings, we’re in dire straits here.’

Which goes to show that, if we pay attention to our troubadours and trailblazers, we might discover that life really does imitate art; that if we wait long enough, most things will come full circle and that those words, written by a young Graham Nash over forty years ago, still hold very true today. Teach your children well. Feed them on your dreams. And know they love you…”

Susan Johnson
OldCityLife

#16/16: Sheila Metzner Fashion

June 19, 2014 § Leave a comment

“Metzner’s devotion to beauty and to art has brought us back to the body, to Apollo, Berger, Modigliani, Paglia, and to Yeats. But more importantly it has brought us back to the greatest faith, the rapturous, life-changing “faith of love” through art.” (From the Introduction by John Wood)

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Fashion, like each and every 21st Editions undertaking, is unique to the 21st Editions Collection of Word, Image and Artisan Bindings. A year in the planning stages and a year in the making, Fashion affords an alternative way of viewing, interacting, and sharing a classic and rare kind of photographic print (Fresson) and presentation. To encompass a career articulating fashion through the art of Sheila Metzner is not possible in five separate presentations, yet using some of those she is most famous for does pay homage to the importance of this artist in the history of fashion and of photography.

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Early on, after seeing some of the prints that Theodore Fresson initially printed for Sheila she wrote him: “Thank you for the fine prints. It is as though you read my mind. They are perfect…” She continues today to work with the Fresson family exclusively for her color work.

“Color is the key. Since Steichen and Outerbridge, who worked in the carbon process, color printing became a dye process. Dyes were fugitive, only three colors, no black. It wasn’t until I searched for, and found Fresson, that I felt I could work in color. The proces de charbon, a carbon print, made with pigment colors, is the only truly archival printing process on earth. You have all the colors a painter has, as well as blacks and greys. It was invented by Theodore Henri Fresson in 1891, and remains with his grandson, and great-grandson today.” -Sheila Metzner

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